Abolitionism

An in-depth look at welfarism vs. abolitionism, centred on a conversation with Gary Francione.

In a phone interview from Newark, New Jersey, Francione pointed out that the whole raison d’être of the animal-rights movement, like all social-justice movements, is to extend compassion and respect—without discrimination based on factors like race, sex, ability, or species—to all beings.

“It doesn’t make sense to go around yelling and condemning people.…There is a very misanthropic pulse that runs through the animal-rights movement,” he said. “If I was a seal hunter, I would be highly offended and I would be saying, ‘Why are they coming after me?’ Well, it’s because I’m an easy target. Similarly, I will have nothing to do with anti-fur campaigns. Should women wearing fur? No. But am I interested in [targeting] women who wear fur? Not really. I’m much more interested in leather, wool—the sorts of things that are worn ubiquitously. The fur issue is so small…it just gives people another reason to go up to women on the street and give them a hard time.

“Listen, I don’t like what they [hunters and fur farmers] are doing to animals, but I don’t like what any of us are doing to animals, and so I don’t see why they should be treated differently from anybody else. We all share in this mess. We’re all responsible, and we all have to do something about it.”

He said that although these groups give us many reasons to be alienated by the animal-rights movement, they’re not giving us any reason to change the way we view animals in any meaningful way.

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1 Response to “”


  1. 1 R.C. December 19, 2009 at 1:02 am

    This is the type of stuff that people who do nothing to help anyone, like to say. But here is something to think about.

    The planet is plagued with evil doings by humans, so who can solve all its ills at once? Not to mention that those on are precisely the multimillion dollar animal abusers. People who care only have their voices. Got it?


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